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:iconzatip:
hey!
I found your fanfic-account before this one. you wrote 5 stories there. may i ask why you did not finish 2 of them?
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:iconfjordmustang:
Thanks very much for the watch!   And for reading my fanfiction!

I have been pretty bad about finishing those stories.  They are stories I intend to finish, but I keep getting writer's block.  I seem to be most creative when I am traveling in Europe, so I hope I can do that soon again.  :-) 
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:iconpepperdarcy:
PepperDarcy Oct 20, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
*FINALLY* I'm here again ;) sorry about the delay. It just gets busy and then I post art from work, and have gobs of stuff to answer :faint:
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:iconfjordmustang:
No problem! I was actually in Western Poland the last few days visiting a fellow HTTYD friend and fan.
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:iconpepperdarcy:
PepperDarcy Oct 20, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
you were in Poland?! :omfg: that is AMAZING! So glad you got back safe! I just finished TWO chapters... that's how wound up I was... and NOW I gotta type. I have two scenes in mind 1. cuz I was listening to Harry Potter 7 soundtrack while reading (I listen to music while I read/type/draw) and it inspired something I was needing to write... but the sad music told me the touch it needed ;) a Hermione/Harry touch of brother/sister friendship 2. you inspired another scene. before I saw HTTYD Ithilwen was gonna have a devious dragon named Drazearra. Bright blue, amazing, fun-- rides it etc. and... I've got that scene in my head now from your writing and wanna write it! I think I'll post it if it turns out well! :nod: so thank you for inspiration, Fjord!! :happybounce:
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:iconfjordmustang:
Hello there.

So honored to have inspired you, my lady! I think your Drazearra chapter will be very interesting from the sound o fit!

I was visiting Whitefang333 (Bialykiel333 on this site). We met through fanfiction.net and I've been helping him with his fanfiction, which he has not been posting here yet. His English is very good, but I help him with basic grammar proofing and also some plot and scene suggestions. In return, he proofs my stories for loopholes and some biological ideas about how dragons could function in real life. (He's got a Master's degree in Biology and is interested in herpetology and also marine biology).

I was in Wrocław in southwestern Poland. It's part of a region called Silesia, which once was a kingdom made up of what is today parts of Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic. It's not well known to Americans, but it's such a beautiful jewel of a city. It's been compared to Venice because it sits on a series of islands connected by beautiful bridges. Much of the architecture is very much Medieval and Renaissance and beautifully preserved. I was blown away by its beauty and how safe it was and how kind the people were. Wrocław was originally Polish, then it became part of Germany, then the Czech Republic, then Austria, then Germany again and, after WWII, again is Polish. I was also lucky I had my friend as a guide. Most of the museums are not in English with displays, so he interpreted for me. I had learned about this region in school a bit, but being able to see it in more detail was really cool.

There were also some sad things I saw like a visit to the Walim tunnels in the Owl Mountains near the Czech border where the Nazis built mountain tunnels to store things- weapons? nuclear bombs? Art they stole from European castles? The Russian Amber Chamber? We still don't know what. They used concentration camp labor for digging the tunnels. My heart was really broken by the abuse those poor Jewish men and boys had to go through. Very few of them lived more than four months under such conditions. It made me angry that such innocent, decent people were treated horribly and worked until they died because of Nazi hatred. Hatred is such a horrible thing in the human race. It's so tragic that so few follow Christ's example of tolerance and forgiveness.

I am glad I got to visit this region and learn more about its history, both tragic and joyful. And nice to meet a fellow HTTYD fan in the flesh. I work for an airline, so I get benefits to travel- so it's nice to use them to meet nice, ethical, trustworthy people I meet online.
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:iconpepperdarcy:
PepperDarcy Oct 22, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
d'aw! that's so cool that you can visit people like this WITH your work! So if you're ever in the Tulsa/Joplin area, you could visit me ;)

but that's great you got to meet him and that you and he can do work and help each other so well!! :happybounce: that would be *so* awesome!

yeah, those things that happened in Germany by the Nazis were *SO* sad :tears: It's ironic, I think, that I have Jewish and German blood :?

but yeah, that stuff is so sad. And I don't understand how some people in America can say that it didn't happen and those people who are *still* alive are just lying about it :'( Who'd lie about *that*? I know the basics, but I have a hard time actually watching documentaries about it. it makes me so sad and depressed :tears:

It's so awful what they did to the Jews back then. Hatred is hard and sad and awful. Yes, love and forgiveness would do the world a lot of good.

I'm glad you got to visit that place too! Even though obviously parts of it were desperately sad!!

So now I know how you get to visit so many amazing places. So have ya been to England then?
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:iconfjordmustang:
It is sad about hatred. Humanity has such an inclination for self destruction. We have had many holocausts in our history- the last being the genocide of people in Uganda. It's so important that people never forget these horrific incidents. Tolerance is important and so is making sure that we have stable economies in our world. So much hatred comes about because of tough economic times.

Interesting you have both German and Jewish ancestry and not surprising given the immigration to America from so many different ethnic groups. A lot of Germans who came to the USA in the late 19th century were Jewish as well as Christian.

Yes, I have been to the UK several times- mostly Scotland, I admit. I rather prefer rural England to London, and I really like Scotland's nature and culture a lot.

I'll keep that in mind about Joplin/Tulsa. I am originally from the Missouri area myself (my mom was born in Scotland but her family moved to the USA when she was a teen).
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:iconpepperdarcy:
PepperDarcy Oct 24, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Weird how on one hand we try to preserve ourselves, but in a way, what we do is exactly what tears us down and destroys ourselves, isn't it :? ironic. Huh?

Yay! maybe we'll get to meet each other someday :nod:

Oh awesome! it'd be neat to get to visit the UK!! :happybounce: You're very blessed! :) Really? your mom is Scottish? that's *cool*!!
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:iconfjordmustang:
I'm sure you'll get to the UK in the not so far future. It just takes some planning and saving,but travel these days is easier than ever. And also there are lots of inexpensive ways to travel, too, with hostels and internet tickets and reasonably priced air and hotel packages. And traveling in the off seasons (like, not the summer months)

I do consider myself lucky since it took lots of years of rejected job applications and self study about the tourism industry and job networking to get a job with a Nordic airline. Most airlines have employee travel bureaus run by someone on their staff. Different airlines work with each other to have interline agreements where our staff can travel on each others' airlines for really low rates- sometimes just the cost of government taxes and service fees. Of course it means we go standby, but that's to be expected. If you plan your travel right you can usually get on the flights. I think we must have about 50 airlines or so around the world who have employee agreements with my company. I often wind up helping employees from other airlines with travel advice about Iceland and Scandinavia and helping them get discounts at hotels and such- it's always to see their interest in visiting Iceland. And it's nice to make friends with employees from other airlines. You never know when you might need their help down the road. All in all, our companies compete with each other for business, but we often help each other, too, like when one airline has to cancel a flight and needs to reroute passengers to their destination on other airlines.

I enjoyed visiting the UK, and I am sure you will, too. It has language and cultural similarities with North America that makes it a comfortable destination for first time travel overseas. Plus it's a fascinating destination for the history, nature, culture and even the food (just stick to eating pub food rather than high class British restaurants that overcook all their food. ) I found the pub cuisine tastier and sometimes healthier, too, since they cooked from scratch, used local ingredients and often included veggies in their meals- plus people at the pubs are very friendly in a social way. People go to the pubs to chat with friends and neighbors, not to find dates or get drunk. Plus, if you don't drink alcohol, the pubs serve lots of local drinks that are non alcoholic. I used to visit the pubs for lunch or an early dinner, and I found them nice places overall.

Yup, my mother is Scottish. My own accent has a lot of Scots in it, though it is American. The Scottish accent does pop out more from time to time. My mom is Scottish with parents from Glasgow and from the Hebrides Islands. She was born in Kingston on Hull, Yorkshire in 1941 during a Nazi bombing raid. Apparently Hull was the second most attacked city in the UK after London because of its close proximity to the European continent and its harbor. 95% of its buildings were damaged from German bombs. Apparently, when my mom was born a bombing was going on, so she was baptised very quickly by a hospital Catholic priest and then placed under the operating room table for safety while the bombs went off. My mom likes to believe she survived that night for a reason, so she never takes life for granted. She has some vivid memories of the war, even though she was a very young child, like of my grand dad (a doctor) riding off on his bike to take care of injured soldiers and civilians. He could not use lights because of the blackout rules. And it took years for the UK to recover, so long after the war people were still scraping by-- my mom never tasted chocolate or candy until she was an older girl because sugar was so rare for British people after the war. For her, vitamin C tablets were candy.

After the UK became more socialist, my grandparents decided to move to North America since they realized that as doctors they would be penalized by the new system with very heavy taxes and also the possibility the kids would not be admitted to college or university in order to equalize the system. So they moved first to Ireland, then Canada and then the USA. I think they made a good decision since my mom and her siblings all went to college-- mostly paid for by academic scholarships and part time jobs. My grandfather and grandmother were doctors, but they were not super wealthy, and so they impressed on my family the importance of working hard and saving to get what you most want in life. They found the USA offered opportunities that were not available in the UK, so they did very well in the USA with hard work and also helping out in their community. In a way, they really were the immigrant success story, just like those immigrants who come today from Latin America or Asia or Africa or the Middle East. These are people who are willing to work hard to get opportunities they would not have in their own homelands.

Anyway, that's my family history. I sure think you will get to the UK one day.
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